The Bologna Archaeological Museum, in cooperation with prestigious Italian universities, institutions, and independent scholars, recently began a vast investigation programme on a group of Egyptian coffins of Theban provenance dating to the first millennium BC, primarily the 25th–26th Dynasty (c. 746–525 BC). Herein, we present the results of the multidisciplinary investigation car-ried out on one of these coffins before its restoration intervention: the anthropoid wooden coffin of Un‐Montu (Inv. MCABo EG1960). The integration of radiocarbon dating, wood species identifica-tion, and CT imaging enabled a deep understanding of the coffin’s wooden structure. In particular, we discuss the results of the tomographic investigation performed in situ. The use of a transportable X‐ray facility largely reduced the risks associated with the transfer of the large object (1.80 cm tall) out of the museum without compromising image quality. Thanks to the 3D tomographic imaging, the coffin revealed the secrets of its construction technique, from the rational use of wood to the employment of canvas (incamottatura), from the use of dowels to the assembly procedure.

X‐ray Tomography Unveils the Construction Technique of Un‐Montu’s Egyptian Coffin (Early 26th Dynasty)

Quarta G.;Calcagnile L.;
2022-01-01

Abstract

The Bologna Archaeological Museum, in cooperation with prestigious Italian universities, institutions, and independent scholars, recently began a vast investigation programme on a group of Egyptian coffins of Theban provenance dating to the first millennium BC, primarily the 25th–26th Dynasty (c. 746–525 BC). Herein, we present the results of the multidisciplinary investigation car-ried out on one of these coffins before its restoration intervention: the anthropoid wooden coffin of Un‐Montu (Inv. MCABo EG1960). The integration of radiocarbon dating, wood species identifica-tion, and CT imaging enabled a deep understanding of the coffin’s wooden structure. In particular, we discuss the results of the tomographic investigation performed in situ. The use of a transportable X‐ray facility largely reduced the risks associated with the transfer of the large object (1.80 cm tall) out of the museum without compromising image quality. Thanks to the 3D tomographic imaging, the coffin revealed the secrets of its construction technique, from the rational use of wood to the employment of canvas (incamottatura), from the use of dowels to the assembly procedure.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11587/464664
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