During their useful life, polymers are subject to degradation processes due to exposure to specific environmental conditions over long times. These processes generally lead to changes, almost always irreversible, of properties and performances of polymers, changes which would be useful to be able to predict in advance. To meet this need, numerous investigations have been focused on the possibility to predict the long-term performance of polymers, if exposed to specific environments, by the so called “accelerated aging” tests. In such procedures, the long-term behavior of polymeric materials is typically predicted by subjecting them to cycles of radiations, temperatures, vapor condensation, and other external agents, at levels well above those found in true conditions in order to accelerate the degradation of polymers: this can produce effects that substantially deviate from those observable under natural exposure. Even following the standard codes, different environmental parameters are often used in the diverse studies, making it difficult to compare different investigations. The correlation of results from accelerated procedures with data collected after natural exposure is still a debated matter. Furthermore, since the environmental conditions are a function of the season and the geographical position, and are also characteristic of the type of exposure area, the environmental parameters to be used in accelerated aging tests should also consider these variables. These and other issues concerning accelerated aging tests applied to polymers are analyzed in the present work. However, bearing in mind the limitations of these practices, they can find useful applications for rating the durability of polymeric materials.

Can accelerated aging procedures predict the long term behavior of polymers exposed to different environments?

M. Frigione
;
2021-01-01

Abstract

During their useful life, polymers are subject to degradation processes due to exposure to specific environmental conditions over long times. These processes generally lead to changes, almost always irreversible, of properties and performances of polymers, changes which would be useful to be able to predict in advance. To meet this need, numerous investigations have been focused on the possibility to predict the long-term performance of polymers, if exposed to specific environments, by the so called “accelerated aging” tests. In such procedures, the long-term behavior of polymeric materials is typically predicted by subjecting them to cycles of radiations, temperatures, vapor condensation, and other external agents, at levels well above those found in true conditions in order to accelerate the degradation of polymers: this can produce effects that substantially deviate from those observable under natural exposure. Even following the standard codes, different environmental parameters are often used in the diverse studies, making it difficult to compare different investigations. The correlation of results from accelerated procedures with data collected after natural exposure is still a debated matter. Furthermore, since the environmental conditions are a function of the season and the geographical position, and are also characteristic of the type of exposure area, the environmental parameters to be used in accelerated aging tests should also consider these variables. These and other issues concerning accelerated aging tests applied to polymers are analyzed in the present work. However, bearing in mind the limitations of these practices, they can find useful applications for rating the durability of polymeric materials.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11587/455698
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