Optogenetics sets new experimental para-digms that can reveal cell type-specific contributions on the neural basis of behavior. Since most of the available systems for this purpose are based on approaches that tether animals to a set of cables, recent research activities have been focused on minimizing external factors that can alter animal movements. Current wireless optogenetic systems are based on waveguide-coupled light-emitting diodes (LED) and implanted μLEDs. However, each configuration separately suffers from significant limitations, such as low coupling efficiency, penetration depth, and invasiveness of waveguide-coupled LED, and local heat generated by implanted μLEDs. This work presents a novel wireless head-mountable stimulating system for a wide-volume light delivery. The device couples the output of a semiconductor laser diode (LD) to a tapered optical fiber (TF) on a wireless platform. The LD-TF coupling was engineered by setting up far-field analysis, which allows a full exploitation of mode division demultiplexing properties of TFs. The output delivered light along the tapered segment is capable of stimulating structures of depths up to ∼2 mm. TFs are tapered to a gradual taper angle (Ψ ∼ 2° to Ψ ∼ 10°) that ends with a sharp tip (∼500 nm) for smooth insertion and less invasiveness. Thus, the proposed system extends the capabilities of wireless optogenetic by offering a novel solution for wide volume light delivery in deep brain regions. © 1964-2012 IEEE.

A Wireless Head-Mountable Device with Tapered Optical Fiber-Coupled Laser Diode for Light Delivery in Deep Brain Regions

M. S. Emara;M. Pisanello;L. Sileo;M. De Vittorio;
2019

Abstract

Optogenetics sets new experimental para-digms that can reveal cell type-specific contributions on the neural basis of behavior. Since most of the available systems for this purpose are based on approaches that tether animals to a set of cables, recent research activities have been focused on minimizing external factors that can alter animal movements. Current wireless optogenetic systems are based on waveguide-coupled light-emitting diodes (LED) and implanted μLEDs. However, each configuration separately suffers from significant limitations, such as low coupling efficiency, penetration depth, and invasiveness of waveguide-coupled LED, and local heat generated by implanted μLEDs. This work presents a novel wireless head-mountable stimulating system for a wide-volume light delivery. The device couples the output of a semiconductor laser diode (LD) to a tapered optical fiber (TF) on a wireless platform. The LD-TF coupling was engineered by setting up far-field analysis, which allows a full exploitation of mode division demultiplexing properties of TFs. The output delivered light along the tapered segment is capable of stimulating structures of depths up to ∼2 mm. TFs are tapered to a gradual taper angle (Ψ ∼ 2° to Ψ ∼ 10°) that ends with a sharp tip (∼500 nm) for smooth insertion and less invasiveness. Thus, the proposed system extends the capabilities of wireless optogenetic by offering a novel solution for wide volume light delivery in deep brain regions. © 1964-2012 IEEE.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11587/434908
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 7
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact