The possibility of exploring basic biological phenomena requires the development of new and efficient bioimaging tools. These should ideally combine the feasibility of production (potentially through the use of green chemistry) together with high targeting efficiency, low cytotoxicity, and optimal contrast characteristics. In this work, we developed nanovesicles based on cardanol, a natural and renewable byproduct of the cashew industry, and a fluorescent reporter was encapsulated in them through an environment-friendly synthesis method. In vitro investigations demonstrated that the cardanol nanovesicles are efficiently taken-up by both professional and non-professional phagocytic cells, which have been modeled in our approach by macrophages and HeLa cells, respectively. Co-localization studies show high affinity of the nanovesicles towards the cell plasma membrane. Moreover, metabolic assays confirmed that these nanostructures are biocompatible in a specific concentration range, and do not promote inflammation response in human macrophages. Stability studies carried out at different temperatures showed that the nanovesicles are stable at both 37 C and 20 C, while the formation of aggregates occurs when the nanodispersion is incubated at 4 C. The results demonstrate the high potential of fluorescent cardanol nanovesicles as a green bioimaging tool, especially for investigating cell membrane dynamics.

A green method for the production of an efficient bioimaging nanotool

Bloise, Ermelinda
Writing – Review & Editing
;
Di Bello, Maria Pia
Investigation
;
Mele, Giuseppe
Writing – Review & Editing
;
2019

Abstract

The possibility of exploring basic biological phenomena requires the development of new and efficient bioimaging tools. These should ideally combine the feasibility of production (potentially through the use of green chemistry) together with high targeting efficiency, low cytotoxicity, and optimal contrast characteristics. In this work, we developed nanovesicles based on cardanol, a natural and renewable byproduct of the cashew industry, and a fluorescent reporter was encapsulated in them through an environment-friendly synthesis method. In vitro investigations demonstrated that the cardanol nanovesicles are efficiently taken-up by both professional and non-professional phagocytic cells, which have been modeled in our approach by macrophages and HeLa cells, respectively. Co-localization studies show high affinity of the nanovesicles towards the cell plasma membrane. Moreover, metabolic assays confirmed that these nanostructures are biocompatible in a specific concentration range, and do not promote inflammation response in human macrophages. Stability studies carried out at different temperatures showed that the nanovesicles are stable at both 37 C and 20 C, while the formation of aggregates occurs when the nanodispersion is incubated at 4 C. The results demonstrate the high potential of fluorescent cardanol nanovesicles as a green bioimaging tool, especially for investigating cell membrane dynamics.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11587/429210
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