The reputation of Nicola Sole (1821-1859), who wrote impromptu, political and lyric poems, is still affected by Francesco De Sanctis’ opinion. Sole’s critical reception – the author was neglected by most 20th-century anthologies on 19th-century poets – could not be restored even after the posthumous publication of his collected works, edited by Bonaventura Zumbini in 1896 with a rich introduction and the only two collections of poems published when he was alive, L’arpa lucana (1848) and Canti (1858). Both of them contain a poem, Al mare Jonio, with significant variants by the author in the 1858 edition, which has a classicist stamp but also modern influences, such as Gioberti’s Primato and Foscolo’s Sepolcri. Indeed, Sole derives the idea to identify the origins of Italian civilization in Magna Graecia from the presbyter of Turin, whereas he imitates the organization of Foscolo’s work in descriptive scenes and the emulation of past res gestae. As for the distinctive sea voyage framework of the poem, his model is Byron’s poem Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage, which the English Romantic author wrote between 1812 and 1818, recalling his excursions across the Mediterranean and the Aegean Seas. However, Sole enriches the antiquarian trip topic, which was traditional in travel literature of his time, with patriotic and civil implications. Praising Magna Graecia, its places and eminent personalities, Sole does not show fruitless provincialism, but is part of that movement based on the rediscovery and promotion of Italy’s pre-Roman roots which was promoted by the classical scholar Giuseppe Micali during the Risorgimento, and which inspired Neo-Guelphism (Sole had joined it through Gioberti and Capponi) at historiographical level, on an anti-secular basis. Unlike Micali, Sole does not have polemic incentive, but considers the identity of Magna Graecia as a prelude to Greek and Latin identity, to be revived in the new historical and political context with precise ideological aim.

"Al mare Jonio" di Nicola Sole: un itinerario turistico-odeporico in chiave patriottica

marco Leone
2020-01-01

Abstract

The reputation of Nicola Sole (1821-1859), who wrote impromptu, political and lyric poems, is still affected by Francesco De Sanctis’ opinion. Sole’s critical reception – the author was neglected by most 20th-century anthologies on 19th-century poets – could not be restored even after the posthumous publication of his collected works, edited by Bonaventura Zumbini in 1896 with a rich introduction and the only two collections of poems published when he was alive, L’arpa lucana (1848) and Canti (1858). Both of them contain a poem, Al mare Jonio, with significant variants by the author in the 1858 edition, which has a classicist stamp but also modern influences, such as Gioberti’s Primato and Foscolo’s Sepolcri. Indeed, Sole derives the idea to identify the origins of Italian civilization in Magna Graecia from the presbyter of Turin, whereas he imitates the organization of Foscolo’s work in descriptive scenes and the emulation of past res gestae. As for the distinctive sea voyage framework of the poem, his model is Byron’s poem Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage, which the English Romantic author wrote between 1812 and 1818, recalling his excursions across the Mediterranean and the Aegean Seas. However, Sole enriches the antiquarian trip topic, which was traditional in travel literature of his time, with patriotic and civil implications. Praising Magna Graecia, its places and eminent personalities, Sole does not show fruitless provincialism, but is part of that movement based on the rediscovery and promotion of Italy’s pre-Roman roots which was promoted by the classical scholar Giuseppe Micali during the Risorgimento, and which inspired Neo-Guelphism (Sole had joined it through Gioberti and Capponi) at historiographical level, on an anti-secular basis. Unlike Micali, Sole does not have polemic incentive, but considers the identity of Magna Graecia as a prelude to Greek and Latin identity, to be revived in the new historical and political context with precise ideological aim.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11587/441988
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